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Shaping Up - "BRI"ef: 103

-Thursday, October 23, 2014

In the last BRI”ef, we reviewed packaging categories. These are the general terms used to describe a package, such as bottle, jar, jug, etc. Once you know the general category of container you are looking for, the next step is to determine what shape of container you want.

Shapes

Square, oval, round and oblong are the basic shapes in packaging and are pretty simple to understand, as they are shapes we’ve been taught from as far back as we can remember. However, there are many shapes in the packaging and container industry.

6 oz Antique Green Glass Cork Top Pyramid BottleTriangle and pyramid bottles (shown on the left) are occasionally seen in the design of bottles. Used mostly in perfume or decorative bottles, the unique shapes give a high-class look to products making them highly desired.

9 oz Dodecagon Clear Glass JarMore complex shapes such as hexagon, octagon, dodecagon and spherical can be seen as well, primarily in jars used for canning and candle making. Hexagon jars have six sides, while octagon jars have eight and dodecagon jars have twelve (shown on the right). Sphere or globe shapes are usually found in perfume or decorative bottles.

Additional terms to know

16 oz Clear Glass French Square BottleContainer manufacturers also take shapes a step further by incorporating beveled or squat into their descriptions. A beveled bottle (like the one pictured to the left), is a bottle that has intersecting angles reduced to less than a right angle, or more simply put the square corners of the  bottle have be slanted.  A squat bottle is short in height when compared to a large diameter. 

Other terms that define bottles shapes include straight sided (meaning the walls of the jar or bottle run straight from top to bottom), and cylinder.

Save time and money…

Having a general idea of the shape and category of container you desire helps to narrow down your search for the perfect bottle. Much like walking into any department store, it helps to have a general idea of what you are shopping for. Knowing you want clothes or more specifically a pair of jeans, helps lessen the amount of time spent shopping. As we go through the “BRI”efs, it is my hope that you will be able to further define your search for packaging; ultimately saving you time and money on that perfect packaging look you desire. Join me next time as I discuss the various styles of packaging; from Boston rounds to Spice jars. We will be reviewing what makes each style special.

Feel free to email us or call us at (855) 754-3728 if you should ever need assistance with choosing the correct product for your specific needs. Should you have any questions about this blog or ideas for future posts, please email me at brianne.livas@packagingoptionsdirect.com and type BLOG TOPIC in the subject line.

Packaging Your Product Is Important: Glass vs Plastic - View Infographic

-Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Glass Is A Great Option

Creating awesome products is fun. Choosing how to package them in the most elegant manner can be more challenging. As you know, Packaging Options Direct offers glass, plastic, metal tins and more options. We are not here to tell you which option is best for your product, although, we scour the internet for cool information to provide to you.

Glass vs Plastic For Your Product

The below infographic from our friends at BottlesUp Glass illustrates why glass may (depending on your product) be a better option for your product.

Omnibus Survey: Glass vs Plastic

http://www.bottlesupglass.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Omnibus-Survey.jpg

It seems like people prefer glass over plastic at the presentation level. It is interesting that 81% of people say that glass containers are more appealing on the shelf. Also, 1 in 3 people would buy more of their favorite foods and drinks in glass, if they were available.

We hope you enjoyed this short message.

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Packaging Categories - "BRI"ef: 102

-Friday, October 3, 2014

Categories in the container and packaging industry are general terms used to describe a package. Bottles, jars, cans, jugs, pails, drums, and tubes are just a few. They are very broad terms which do not provide much information; but in understanding basic packaging categories, you can begin to narrow the search on the specific item you want for your product.  At Packaging Options Direct, our product line is mostly comprised bottles, and jars; with a few others mixed in.

In this second “BRI”ef, I want to provide you with a better understanding of the basic categories used for packaging. If you need to reference our first “BRI”ef  “Introduction to Packaging”, click here.

Bottles

Glass and Plastic BottlesBottles come in a variety of materials. Aluminum, glass and plastic are the most common, and each type of material has its own sub-type. We’ll get into material types later. Typically speaking, bottles have narrow mouths; which means the opening of the bottle is roughly one half the diameter of the container or smaller.  Bottles are primarily used to store liquids of various viscosities like beer, shampoo, and even ketchup. Bottles can come in an endless number of shapes, and sizes; and take a wide range of closures and finishes.

 

Jars

Glass and Plastic JarsJars usually have a wide mouth; meaning the mouth opening of the jar is roughly half the diameter of the body of the jar, or larger. Jars are most commonly found in glass and plastic and, like bottles, can come in a variety of shapes though the most common are straight sided or economy style canning jars (commonly referred to as Mason jars). Jars usually have continuous thread or lug finishes; and though they are typically cylindrical, they can come in other shapes.

 

Jugs

Glass JugJugs are more oblong, are usually thicker near the middle than the top, and will always have handles. Jugs are usually a half- gallon or larger and come in glass or plastic. The normal finishes on Jugs are a continuous thread finish, though they have also been known to come with smooth finishes for use with corks or as those seen on large water jugs (like Sparkletts). Liquid storage is the most common use for jugs.

 

Cans

Plastic PailCans, like bottles and jars, come in a variety of materials and have just as many uses and styles. Paint cans are the most common, however they can come with screw cap finishes, in oblong and cone shapes or can even be square. Pails and drums are types of cans. Pails, also commonly known as buckets, often come in plastic or steel. They are deep, cylindrical containers that are normally made of metal, plastic or wood. Pails are often known to come with handles and have tight fitting lids with gaskets that provide an airtight seal. Pails are good for storing liquid and solid items. When people think of small versions of pails or buckets, you often think of tubs.  Drums are made of steel, stainless steel, plastic, composite or fiber. They come in open, closed or tight heads, and can be round or square, lined or unlined, seamed or unseamed.

 

Tubes

Plastic TubeTubes come in a variety of shapes, sizes and materials. The two main characteristics of tubes are those that have one end that is crimped and others that stand on their caps. Tubes have a large variety of applications and are often used in toiletries, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, household products and more. For more information on cans, pails, drums or tubes, you can contact our parent company TricorBraun.

 

Now that you have an idea of the general categories that you containers fall under, we can start to look at sub-categories, finishes, closures and so much more. Join me next time as we continue our journey through the world of packaging, and as always, I am happy to help any time you have questions.

Feel free to email us or call us at (855) 754-3728 if you should ever need assistance with choosing the correct product for your specific needs. Should you have any questions about this blog or ideas for future posts, please email me at brianne.livas@packagingoptionsdirect.com and type BLOG TOPIC in the subject line.