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Style Is More than Clothes - “BRI”ef: 104

-Friday, November 7, 2014

When most of us think about style our first thought it about the latest runway fashion, which in the long run trickles down to what clothes we put on each day. Style plays a very important role in the world of packaging and much like dressing yourself to impress, you have to dress your product to impress too.

Packaging comes in a huge assortment of styles and choosing the right style for your product is important. You want your packaging to make a statement. In my previous blog “Shaping Up” I discussed the shapes of bottles; and each of those shapes can be further subcategorized into style. In this “BRI”ef we are going to review the more popular styles of bottles and jars to give you a better insight into the world of packaging.

Round Bottles

Round bottles can be a vague description, but when we refer to bottles as Boston rounds, Imperial rounds or Modern rounds we can greatly reduce the number of returns we get on a search.

Round Bottle Styles

Boston round bottles have a round cylindrical shape with a short curved shoulders. These bottles are a very popular style as they are great for a variety of uses: aromatherapy, apothecary, and medicinal; and everything in between. A fluted Boston round bottle is similar to a regular Boston round, but has gradually tapered shoulders versus the short curved shoulders of a standard Boston round.

Sauce bottles, carafes, and decanters can be used interchangeably for a sauces, beverages, and syrups. They can come with a continuous thread or lug finish, which makes them great for use in the kitchen. The primary difference between a sauce bottle and a decanter is that a sauce bottle tends to have an indented label panel; and decanters are more decorative and are specifically made for liquor or wine.

Bullet bottles, also commonly known as Imperial rounds or Cosmo rounds, are tall narrow bottles with gradually slopped shoulders. The difference between the three styles really comes down to which manufacturer made the bottles. Bullet bottles are usually made of plastic and due to their slim and stylish look, are great for a multitude of uses.

Cylinder bottles are tall and narrow, like Bullet bottles, but have squared off shoulders and straight sides. Also like Bullet bottles, they tend to come in plastic.

Jugs can come in glass or plastic, and in either case, always have a handle for the ease of use. Great for bulk products or beverages, the bottles large capacity makes them ideal for a number of purposes.

Round Jars

Like bottles, jars come in so many shapes and sizes. Round jars are pretty common.

Round Jar Styles

Paragon and economy jars are great for canning and preserving. Paragon jars are usually tall and narrow, where economy jars can vary slightly in shape and tend to have a slight shoulder; unless they are wide mouthed as pictured above.  They can come with either a continuous thread finish or a lug finish.

Double wall jars are plastic jars that have an inner and outer wall. They tend to give an appearance of larger volume and tend also protect the contents of the jar due to the dual walls.

Spice jars can come in glass or plastic and though they can be square, round or unique with an area specific for a label, they almost always come with a finish fit for snap on fitments.

Wine Bottles

Wine Bottle Styles

Claret bottles tend to have a short neck, short shoulder, and a long body; and are also commonly known as a Bordeaux bottles. These bottles are good for red wines and blends such as Cabernet Francs, Cabernet Sauvignons, Malbecs, Merlots and Petit Verdot.

Burgundy bottles, which are ideal for Pinot Noirs and Chardonnays, have a short neck, long sloping shoulder and short body. The difference between the Burgundy bottles, Hock bottles and your traditional Champagne bottles it the body of the bottle itself. Champagne bottles have a wider body than Burgundy bottles, while Hock bottles tend to have a more slender body.

While both Claret and Burgundy bottles were typically found with cork finishes, they can now also be found with continuous thread or Stelvin finishes.

You can also find stylish liquor bottles, that don’t necessarily fall into a wine bottle grouping, and because of their uniqueness they are classified as liquor or decorative bottles.

As we are learning, there are endless shapes and styles to bottles and jars as new molds and designs are made every day; and I am sure there are many that this short blog didn’t touch on. I wanted to at least give you an idea as to what the various shapes and styles look like; and how to tell them apart.

Join me next time when I discuss how the color of your containers plays a role in helping you sell your products. Until then, I am happy to help should you have questions. Please feel free to email us, or call us at (855) 754-3728 if you should ever need assistance with choosing the correct product for your specific needs. Should you have any questions about this blog, or ideas for future please email me at brianne.livas@packagingoptionsdirect.com, and type BLOG TOPIC in the subject line.

Shaping Up - "BRI"ef: 103

-Thursday, October 23, 2014

In the last BRI”ef, we reviewed packaging categories. These are the general terms used to describe a package, such as bottle, jar, jug, etc. Once you know the general category of container you are looking for, the next step is to determine what shape of container you want.

Shapes

Square, oval, round and oblong are the basic shapes in packaging and are pretty simple to understand, as they are shapes we’ve been taught from as far back as we can remember. However, there are many shapes in the packaging and container industry.

6 oz Antique Green Glass Cork Top Pyramid BottleTriangle and pyramid bottles (shown on the left) are occasionally seen in the design of bottles. Used mostly in perfume or decorative bottles, the unique shapes give a high-class look to products making them highly desired.

9 oz Dodecagon Clear Glass JarMore complex shapes such as hexagon, octagon, dodecagon and spherical can be seen as well, primarily in jars used for canning and candle making. Hexagon jars have six sides, while octagon jars have eight and dodecagon jars have twelve (shown on the right). Sphere or globe shapes are usually found in perfume or decorative bottles.

Additional terms to know

16 oz Clear Glass French Square BottleContainer manufacturers also take shapes a step further by incorporating beveled or squat into their descriptions. A beveled bottle (like the one pictured to the left), is a bottle that has intersecting angles reduced to less than a right angle, or more simply put the square corners of the  bottle have be slanted.  A squat bottle is short in height when compared to a large diameter. 

Other terms that define bottles shapes include straight sided (meaning the walls of the jar or bottle run straight from top to bottom), and cylinder.

Save time and money…

Having a general idea of the shape and category of container you desire helps to narrow down your search for the perfect bottle. Much like walking into any department store, it helps to have a general idea of what you are shopping for. Knowing you want clothes or more specifically a pair of jeans, helps lessen the amount of time spent shopping. As we go through the “BRI”efs, it is my hope that you will be able to further define your search for packaging; ultimately saving you time and money on that perfect packaging look you desire. Join me next time as I discuss the various styles of packaging; from Boston rounds to Spice jars. We will be reviewing what makes each style special.

Feel free to email us or call us at (855) 754-3728 if you should ever need assistance with choosing the correct product for your specific needs. Should you have any questions about this blog or ideas for future posts, please email me at brianne.livas@packagingoptionsdirect.com and type BLOG TOPIC in the subject line.