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Style Is More than Clothes - “BRI”ef: 104

-Friday, November 7, 2014

When most of us think about style our first thought it about the latest runway fashion, which in the long run trickles down to what clothes we put on each day. Style plays a very important role in the world of packaging and much like dressing yourself to impress, you have to dress your product to impress too.

Packaging comes in a huge assortment of styles and choosing the right style for your product is important. You want your packaging to make a statement. In my previous blog “Shaping Up” I discussed the shapes of bottles; and each of those shapes can be further subcategorized into style. In this “BRI”ef we are going to review the more popular styles of bottles and jars to give you a better insight into the world of packaging.

Round Bottles

Round bottles can be a vague description, but when we refer to bottles as Boston rounds, Imperial rounds or Modern rounds we can greatly reduce the number of returns we get on a search.

Round Bottle Styles

Boston round bottles have a round cylindrical shape with a short curved shoulders. These bottles are a very popular style as they are great for a variety of uses: aromatherapy, apothecary, and medicinal; and everything in between. A fluted Boston round bottle is similar to a regular Boston round, but has gradually tapered shoulders versus the short curved shoulders of a standard Boston round.

Sauce bottles, carafes, and decanters can be used interchangeably for a sauces, beverages, and syrups. They can come with a continuous thread or lug finish, which makes them great for use in the kitchen. The primary difference between a sauce bottle and a decanter is that a sauce bottle tends to have an indented label panel; and decanters are more decorative and are specifically made for liquor or wine.

Bullet bottles, also commonly known as Imperial rounds or Cosmo rounds, are tall narrow bottles with gradually slopped shoulders. The difference between the three styles really comes down to which manufacturer made the bottles. Bullet bottles are usually made of plastic and due to their slim and stylish look, are great for a multitude of uses.

Cylinder bottles are tall and narrow, like Bullet bottles, but have squared off shoulders and straight sides. Also like Bullet bottles, they tend to come in plastic.

Jugs can come in glass or plastic, and in either case, always have a handle for the ease of use. Great for bulk products or beverages, the bottles large capacity makes them ideal for a number of purposes.

Round Jars

Like bottles, jars come in so many shapes and sizes. Round jars are pretty common.

Round Jar Styles

Paragon and economy jars are great for canning and preserving. Paragon jars are usually tall and narrow, where economy jars can vary slightly in shape and tend to have a slight shoulder; unless they are wide mouthed as pictured above.  They can come with either a continuous thread finish or a lug finish.

Double wall jars are plastic jars that have an inner and outer wall. They tend to give an appearance of larger volume and tend also protect the contents of the jar due to the dual walls.

Spice jars can come in glass or plastic and though they can be square, round or unique with an area specific for a label, they almost always come with a finish fit for snap on fitments.

Wine Bottles

Wine Bottle Styles

Claret bottles tend to have a short neck, short shoulder, and a long body; and are also commonly known as a Bordeaux bottles. These bottles are good for red wines and blends such as Cabernet Francs, Cabernet Sauvignons, Malbecs, Merlots and Petit Verdot.

Burgundy bottles, which are ideal for Pinot Noirs and Chardonnays, have a short neck, long sloping shoulder and short body. The difference between the Burgundy bottles, Hock bottles and your traditional Champagne bottles it the body of the bottle itself. Champagne bottles have a wider body than Burgundy bottles, while Hock bottles tend to have a more slender body.

While both Claret and Burgundy bottles were typically found with cork finishes, they can now also be found with continuous thread or Stelvin finishes.

You can also find stylish liquor bottles, that don’t necessarily fall into a wine bottle grouping, and because of their uniqueness they are classified as liquor or decorative bottles.

As we are learning, there are endless shapes and styles to bottles and jars as new molds and designs are made every day; and I am sure there are many that this short blog didn’t touch on. I wanted to at least give you an idea as to what the various shapes and styles look like; and how to tell them apart.

Join me next time when I discuss how the color of your containers plays a role in helping you sell your products. Until then, I am happy to help should you have questions. Please feel free to email us, or call us at (855) 754-3728 if you should ever need assistance with choosing the correct product for your specific needs. Should you have any questions about this blog, or ideas for future please email me at brianne.livas@packagingoptionsdirect.com, and type BLOG TOPIC in the subject line.

Introduction to Packaging - "BRI"ef: 101

-Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Meet your Account Coordinator BriHi! My name is Bri (pronounced Brie, like the cheese) and I’m the Account Coordinator at Packaging Options Direct. I am your go-to person for all things packaging. I'm always happy to assist customers in placing orders but my first priority is helping you understand packaging itself. So I have decided to put together a series of blog posts called “BRI”efs; which will cover all sorts of topics about your packaging needs.

Today’s “BRI”ef is a simple introduction to the world of packaging. Packaging comes in all shapes, styles, materials, finishes, colors and capacities; with just as many finishes. Over the next few articles, we will touch on all of those elements.  

Categories

Glass BottlesContainers are often placed into a category and then sub-categorized by shape and style. Categories are general terms such as drum, pail, tube, bottle, etc. They are very broad terms which do not provide much information. When helping you determine what kind of item you are looking for, I usually try to refer to the sub-category of an item.

Shapes

Shape is a good place to start when trying to determine the look you want. Containers come in all shapes, the basic shapes being: round, square, oval and oblong. Other shapes, such as beveled, add to the many options available.

Styles

The Style of a container can vary from one manufacturer to another, but often it’s more the name than the actual style that is different; as different manufacturers tend to use fancy names for their versions of any particular style of bottles.  A good example of this is Imperial Rounds, Bullets and Cosmo Rounds. All three styles look the same, but are called different names depending on the maker.

Openings

Openings have two basic types: wide mouth and narrow mouth. The term wide mouth refers to any container which as opening roughly half of the diameter of the container or larger. An example would be a one gallon jar often used in pickling. The term narrow mouth describes a container whose opening is roughly one half the diameter of the container or smaller. Beer bottles, and Boston round bottles are perfect examples of containers with a narrow mouth.

Other options…

Materials, Finishes and Colors round out the major components of packaging and each have their own specific function on your packaging.

Product attributesAs you get to know more about the packaging you are looking for, you will be able to use that knowledge to streamline your search on the Packaging Options Direct website. You can use the search feature at the top of the website to look for any of the key attributes located in the diagram on the left, or you can find Material and Style listed in our product attributes key; which you can use to filter products on our site (as shown in the diagram to the right) to find exactly what you are looking for.Product Filters

I will be touching on each of these items individually or at least in smaller and more direct groupings, in my upcoming posts. Should you have any questions regarding packaging that I might be able to address in the blogs, please email me at brianne.livas@packagingoptionsdirect.com and type BLOG TOPIC in the subject line. I’m excited to see what you want to learn about the wonderful world of packaging!

Keep coming back to our blog to get the latest news and helpful resources we’ve put together for you. Visit PackagingOptionsDirect.com/Blog

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